I consider myself an aging athlete who still skis, cycles, dedicates five days a week to fitness, plans to soon plant a garden, and walks up a spring creek with a fly rod. When my arthritic hips and knees began to limit my recreational profile several years ago, I chose the regenerative medicine option rather than joint replacements. Having performed joint replacements for 37 years and studied the benefits and limitations of such, I elected to postpone, perhaps avoid major surgery with the inherent risks and limitations. First it was Platelet rich plasma, next came PRP with Growth factor Proteins; and next came stem cells. At the get go, I did not expect to regenerate cartilage; but I did hope to restore joint function, minimize pain, and maintain the highest possible activity potential. Even with Grade 4 osteoarthritis of my major joints, I can report that I skied for a week in Vail this past February as I did a year ago, recently spent three days wading though spring creeks in Southwestern Wisconsin with a fly rod in pursuit of trout, and cycled 30 miles last Saturday. I am not alone as my biking, skiing and cycling buddy with similar knee issues returned last week from his yearly helicopter skiing adventure. I have been managing his knee arthritic issues with regenerative medicine interventions for over five years.

Then there are the athletes in their 50s. Certainly, the option is there for a joint replacement for a grade three arthritic joint but what If? What if there is a complication, an adverse event, a failure to regain motion, or residual pain? The fall back potion after a failed joint replacement is another joint replacement and the outcomes of revision surgery are frequently not satisfactory. Several weeks ago, I described the recreational pursuits of a 58-year-old volleyball enthusiast who had initially considered a joint replacement when 15 years after an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, the predictable post traumatic arthritis had forced him to suspend his activities. He chose a regenerative medicine stem cell option; and eight weeks thereafter, he is back to playing volleyball three times a week. While on occasion, a booster follow-up injection is needed; we are in the process of developing a manuscript for scientific publication focusing on the successful outcomes of 20 patients followed for one to two years after a combined injection of bone marrow concentrate containing stem cells into the knee and the bone adjacent to the knee. These are recreational athletes between ages 45 and 60 who won’t quit.

On May 4, I am one of three invited faculty to present at The Regenerative Medicine Training Institute (RMTI). On June 7 and 8, I have been asked to participate in the Workshop and Lab Faculty at the largest Regenerative Medicine program in North America (TOBI). Owing to our integration of patient care with scientific outcomes monitoring, we have been able and continue to provide masterful and evidence-based care to aging athletes. To continue to remain in the forefront of Regenerative Medicine, I dedicate a good deal of time reviewing the future while monitoring the outcomes of patient care. Several new treatment options are soon to be launched including expanding my scope of care to those with inflammatory arthritis.

To learn more, call for a consultation (312) 475-1893. You may visit my website: www.sheinkopmd.com

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Special Announcement
Dr. Sheinkop's clinic is being considered for enrollment in the first of its kind FDA approved stem cell clinical trial for knee arthritis. Click here to learn more.