It is my belief and practice that each patient has full understanding of his or her orthopedic condition, its implications, the various options for treatment, and the expected outcome of each treatment. As a basic principle of bioethics, respect for autonomy recognizes an individual person’s right to live that life consistent with personal needs, desires and morality.

Stepping away from the lectern, let me share with you my motivation for the theme running through this blog. I have two arthritic hips, two arthritic knees and one arthritic low back. On Sunday, two of us completed a 35-mile, arduous bike ride from Chicago’s Lincoln Park, stopping for coffee at the northern end of Glencoe and returning home making for a four-hour effort. 12 hours earlier, Sharon and I had danced the night away at the wedding of one of my part time staff members. As an aside, we long ago decided we would never become the older guests at an event that sat out the evening watching the younger crowd shaking their booty to KC and the Sunshine Band. While it is easier for me to write about others and their recreation, athletic and fitness pursuits; even tough more difficult, I wanted to share with my readers what is possible with cellular orthopedic interventions such as I have received. None of this would have been possible prior to my joint preservation and restoration procedures eight months ago.

Stepping back up to the lectern, all too often, a patient will share with me a statement from an initial orthopedic surgical visit in which he or she was subjected to the outdated practice of paternalism, in which that physician dictated the “best” treatment; for arthritis, probably a total joint replacement. Another bioethical principle is one of beneficence; the latter obligates the physician to help the patient do well. This requires the physician to have a knowledge of the expected outcomes of each treatment. Just as a certain restaurant chain’s tagline is “we have the meats”, one of the best reasons for seeking a cellular orthopedic intervention in my practice is we have the outcomes data for each cellular orthopedic intervention we offer.  

Nonmaleficence simply means that physicians should not harm their patients. This is why we have an FDA; yet the plethora of claims for umbilical cord blood, Wharton’s jelly, amniotic fluid, the latter all without proper scientific clinical outcomes or living stem cells when thawed and injected violates the concept of primum non nocere, first do no harm.

If you want to learn more about Cellular Orthopedic interventions to help you postpone or avoid a major surgical procedure, call (847) 390-7666 to schedule a consultation. You may visit my website at www.sheinkopmd.com

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