How Might I Need Stem Cells in 2013

 Actually, since I retired from surgery, I haven’t found it necessary to work weekends so I am able to pursue non-orthopedic interests. When the roads are dry and the temperature is above 40 degrees, I ride those roads around Chicago or Southwestern Wisconsin. The picture accompanying this Blog is that of Floyd Landis, (I am the guy on the left as you view the image). Landis is an American retired cyclist who was awarded the 2006 Tour de France victory but stripped of the title in 2010 after an investigation revealed he had used drugs to obtain victory. That picture above is from 2008. Last week, Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs and is now seeking reconciliation with his longtime nemesis Floyd Landis. What does all this have to do with Cellular Orthopedics, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Platelet Rich Plasma and an aging or injured athlete? Read on.

What I do is safe and affective for the short-term and the long-term with possible regenerative implications. What they did for short-term benefit, DOPING, is harmful to your health in the long run and it is illegal for which there are many continuing ramifications. Regenerative Medicine, Platelet Rich Plasma and Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cell Concentrate might give you the lifetime performance boost by facilitating healing of an injury and controlling and even repairing the impact of arthritis. I use Platelet Rich Plasma for the treatment of knee pain. I use Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate (stem cells) for the treatment of cartilage injuries and arthritis. Basic sciences tell us that PRP stimulates cell proliferation and the production of hyaluronic acid from the lining of your joint. Mesenchymal Stem Cells stimulates the production of cartilage matrix by chondrocytes. The mechanism by which PRP influences tendon and muscle healing is still under investigation. Suffice it to say though that PRP will aid in tendon healing as indicated by a Regenexx case report of the successful management of a complete Achilles rupture.

The clinical use of MSCs for tissue regeneration is very promising because of their capacity to express and release a variety of growth factors and bioactive molecules to promote regeneration of damaged tissue and I continue to accumulate more supportive data. What I am realizing is that one injection series of PRP or Stem Cells may not be adequate to accumulate sufficient transplanted stem cells in to the area of injury when a large number of cells are required to effect healing. To that end, I am encouraging those patients who are not yet satisfied to return for another Regenerative intervention. In the future, my informed consent will introduce that possible need.

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