The Ultimate Performance Success Following a Cellular Orthopedic Procedure

Every year at this time, we each recall and celebrate several significant events of historic, cultural and spiritual importance. No matter what your roots or upbringing or present belief, these past eight days usually involve a gathering of friends and family to jointly read and remember that which happened long ago and still impacts us today. Whether done in a house of worship or in the home, somehow, we ask similar questions and teach our children and grandchildren that which befell us in ancient days. To underscore those similarities, some years ago, when my son had his Bar Mitzvah at the Western Wall, a Franciscan Monk who I had come to know invited us the next day to a Pre-Easter service at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Other than The Gregorian chants and the frankincense, the superstructure of the 90-minute service was quite familiar.

I use this yearly celebration to reflect and meditate; it also initiates the spring cleaning ritual in our house. Having grown up in Humboldt Park and later Albany Park to parents who left Europe in time, Passover meant it was time to clean and wash the kitchen cabinets, recycle, and dispose of certain foods. On Division Street, we lived near my orthodox grandparents; in Albany Park, they lived with us, so the everyday plates and silverware were taken to the basement and exchanged for special settings reserved for this time of year.

Certainly, times have changed and we have assimilated; but my wife still prepares the appropriate meals for the week and makes sure the house is immaculate. Then the family and company visits end and we are challenged by the need to address the residual back scuffs on our wood kitchen floor; lots of them and pronounced. Here is where the ultimate test of the cellular orthopedic intervention to my own hips and knees, now almost four months ago comes into play.

With the coverage varying between the Masters, Cubs, and Sox games in the background, we genuflexed, spread the Murphy Oil Soap and started rubbing away with microfiber wipes. This exercise lasted about two hours, admittedly with several breaks. Nevertheless, we accomplished our mission and I got up unassisted to head to the health club for my strength training respite.

This morning, Section one of the Chicago Tribune carried three full pages, in color, competing ads concerning Regenerative Medicine; none giving much information about science or outcomes but certainly employing one-time prominent athletes as spoke persons. Is it worth a free lunch to become a marketing dupe? As readers of my Blog know, I myself had Cellular Orthopedic intervention to my knees at the end of 2017 and to my hips at the start of 2018. This morning I scheduled two ski trips in 2019 to Vail; on Saturday morning, I am headed to Southwest Wisconsin for a long weekend to bike and fly fish; and I am on standby at any time to genuflex and spread that murphy oil soap.

So as advertised on Friday night Cable, you may receive a $250 gift certificate for attending a Stem Cell Seminar, or you may get examined and receive counsel from this orthopedic surgeon focusing on Cellular orthopedics. For the latter call 312 475 1893 to schedule an appointment, one on one. You may access my web site and watch the webinar at www.Ilcellulartherapy.com

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The tale of two people with arthritic knees

The tale of two people with arthritic knees

It came to pass over the last several weeks that I had contact with two separate patients; one in my office and one by e-mail inquiry. Both individuals had, prior to treatment, roughly the same levels of arthritic impairment. Both with grade three arthritic knees, were similar in age, weight, height and previous levels of activity. The e-mail contact presented with a history of having undergone a total knee replacement two years earlier. The outcome was a swollen, painful and stiff knee leading to a repeat surgery (revision) one year later. Because of persistent pain, swelling and stiffness, a recent knee aspiration had been completed leading to the diagnosis of an infection. The email inquirer indicated that his orthopedic surgeon and infectious disease consultant had recommended surgical removal of the prosthesis, placement of an antibiotic impregnated cement spacer for three months during which time a pic line would allow for a three-month continuum of intravenous antibiotics. There after assuming repeat cultures of the joint would be consistent with elimination of the infection as well confirmed by a normal Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate, C-Reactive Protein and White Blood Cell Count, yet a fourth surgery would allow for another attempt with a Total Knee Prosthesis. All this assuming the infection had been eradicated. Space does not allow for the options if all of the above measures were to fail.

Turning our attention to the second patient who had undergone a Bone Marrow Concentrate/Stem cell intervention as contrasted to the surgical approach, he had recently returned from a second week of helicopter skiing. While it is true that he couldn’t ski eight hours a day for seven straight days, he had enjoyed a great week with friends and his daughter even if he had skied only two full days and four half days. This is his third consecutive year of helicopter skiing made possible by the Bone Marrow Concentrate/Stem Cell intervention he had undergone three and a half years ago.

Certainly, there is a time and place for a joint replacement; but the saga in my first paragraph reviews only some of the risks inherent in said surgery. On the other hand, a Cellular Orthopedic intervention in my experience carries a very minimal risk. In over seven hundred procedures in the last four and a half years, I have not found an infection. Certainly, every patient doesn’t go helicopter skiing after the procedure; our outcomes data clearly documents a return to or continuation of a very active lifestyle after a cellular procedure for an arthritic joint.

To schedule an appointment call (847) 390-7666
To visit my web site go to www.sheinkopmd.com
To watch my webinar visit www.ilcellulartherapy.com

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The Traumatic Initiation of Arthritis

The Traumatic Initiation of Arthritis

Background: It is increasingly recognized that biochemical abnormalities of the joint precede radiographic abnormalities of post traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) by as much as decades. A growing body of evidence strongly suggests that the progression from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury to PTOA is multifactorial, involving the interplay between biomechanical disturbances and biochemical homeostasis of articular cartilage.

Purpose: A randomized study using an acute ACL injury model were to (1) evaluate the natural progression of inflammatory and chondro-degenerative biomarkers, (2) evaluate the relationship between subjective reports of pain and inflammatory and chondro-degenerative biomarkers, and (3) determine if post injury knee drainage (arthrocentesis) and corticosteroid injection offer the ability to alter this biochemical cascade.

Study Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Methods: A total of 49 patients were randomized to 4 groups: group 1 (corticosteroid at 4 days after ACL injury, placebo injection of saline at 2 weeks), group 2 (placebo at 4 days after ACL injury, corticosteroid at 2 weeks), group 3 (corticosteroid at both time intervals), or a placebo group (saline injections at both time intervals). Patient-reported outcome measures and synovial biomarkers were collected at approximately 4 days, 11 days, and 5 weeks after injury. The change between the time points was assessed for all variables using statistical analysis, and the relationship between changes in outcome scores and biomarkers were assessed by calculating a commonly accepted mathematical analysis. Outcomes and biomarkers were also compared between the 4 groups using another statistical approach.

Results: No adverse events or infections were observed in any study patients. With the exception of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and tumor necrosis factor–inducible gene 6 (TSG-6), chondro-degenerative markers worsened over the first 5 weeks while all patient-reported outcomes improved during this time, regardless of treatment group. Patient-reported outcomes did not differ between patients receiving corticosteroid injections and the placebo group. However, increases in C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II), associated with collagen type II breakdown, were significantly greater in the placebo group (1.32 ± 1.10 ng/mL) than in either of the groups that received the corticosteroid injection within the first several days after injury (group 1: 0.23 ± 0.27 ng/mL [P = .01]; group 3: 0.19 ± 0.34 ng/mL [P= .01]).

Conclusion: Post Traumatic Osteoarthritis begins at the time of injury and results early on in dramatic matrix changes in the knee. However, it is encouraging that early intervention with an anti-inflammatory agent was able to affect biomarkers of chondral degeneration. Should early intervention lead to meaningful changes in either the onset or severity of symptomatic PTOA, the current treatment paradigm for patients with ACL injury may have to be restructured to include early aspiration and intra-articular intervention.

This Blog is excerpted from a study appearing in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. My message, should you experience a significant joint injury, don’t wait until arthritic related symptoms appear, the Cellular Orthopedic intervention should take place within weeks; not years.
312-475-4523 to learn more or schedule an appointment

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Special Announcement - Now Enrolling for FDA Approved Stem Cell Study
Dr. Mitchell Sheinkop has completed training and is credentialed for the first of its kind FDA approved stem cell clinical trial for knee arthritis. Our clinic is now enrolling patients in this trial. Contact us at 312-767-5761 for details. Click here to learn more.